FAQs

Q?

Who is YSS?

A.

Yosemite Stanislaus Solutions (YSS) is a collaborative group of diverse interests formed to assist in planning, prioritizing actions, implementing projects, and monitoring outcomes of efforts designed to restore and sustain areas of the southern portion of the Stanislaus National Forest and adjacent Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Yosemite National Park (YNP) lands.

Q?

Why is YSS important?

A.

The collaborative process enables responsible agencies to develop a science-based recovery and restoration approach that will have strong support, beyond that which any one group could accomplish on its own. YSS provides a venue within which multiple agencies, diverse interest groups, and individuals can contribute to elements of recovery and restoration efforts being proposed by public agencies and private land managers. The YSS process is intended to provide an opportunity to capture and document various ideas and perspectives from state, federal, tribal, private, local, regional, and conservation and business interests to gain widespread support and timely implementation. Coordination with other landowners and managers within the project

Q?

What does YSS do?

A.

Part of the charge of the YSS is to collectively coordinate with public and private land managers to identify and prioritize restoration projects and help find funding for specific projects. To this end the collaborative strives to identify, prioritize, and support sustainable projects that help restore degraded resources while simultaneously boosting the region’s economy and social well-being.

Q?

How is YSS funded?

A.

YSS is funded through grants and donations. The Tuolumne River Trust acts as the fiscal agent for the collaborative.

Q?

How do you become a member of YSS?

A.

While membership is open, groups joining YSS must formally commit to uphold the spirit and guidelines of the YSS Charter. YSS aims for members to make informed decisions. Therefore, new members may participate in decision-making after attending one meeting and committing to understanding the information being analyzed as well as previous collaborative discussions. An official membership form must be submitted by any organization wishing to become a member of YSS.

Q?

How does YSS move an idea forward?

A.

Where consensus exists, YSS will issue its support and recommendations for projects and plans affecting lands within the boundary of the area of interest. YSS members can also engage individually or through their own organizations in the traditional NEPA or CEQA processes, submitting comments, attending meetings, and filing objections or support.

Q?

When does YSS meet?

A.

YSS General Membership generally meets every other month on the third Friday of the month. The Leadership Team meets more often to provide opportunities for responding to time-sensitive issues, draft recommendations for the General Membership to consider, and to coordinate planning efforts.

Q?

What about the Rim Fire?

A.

There are many areas worthy of focus within the collaborative landscape area. Specifically, one large swath is that of the Rim Fire. The fire started on August 17, 2013, and burned for weeks across a total of 257,314 acres in Tuolumne and Mariposa counties. With 402 square miles contained within the fire’s perimeter, the Rim Fire became the third largest wildfire in California's history and the biggest wildfire on record in the Sierra Nevada. The fire was contained on Thursday, October 24, 2013. The fire was named for its proximity to the Rim of the World vista point located along Highway 120 in the Stanislaus Forest. The fire destroyed 11 residences, three commercial buildings, and 98 outbuildings. Significant damage was done to habitat, wildlife, livestock, timber, and rangeland resources.

Q?

What activities take place in the Stanislaus National Forest?

A.

Activities such as logging, grazing, mining and recreation are all found within the Forest and are regulated by Forest Administration. Today, the Forest is managed for multiple uses to include water uses such as impoundments and hydroelectric projects.

For more facts about the Stanislaus National Forest visit:
http://www.fs.usda.gov/detailfull/stanislaus/aboutforest/?cid=FSM91_057710&width=full

Q?

What can be found in the Stanislaus National Forest?

A.

The mountains within the Forest were shaped by volcanic and glacial action, producing rugged and spectacular topography at high elevations. Each elevation, from 1,500 to over 11,000 feet above sea level, has its own unique vegetation, wildlife, and corresponding temperatures. While the lower elevations are hot and dry, the higher elevations’ meadows are cooled by melting snow. The Forest is home to Sierra mixed conifer, true fir, lodge pole pine and sub-alpine vegetation. Bald eagle, peregrine falcon, spotted owl, fisher and wolverine have all been reported on the Forest. The Forest is rich in its variety of wildlife and habitat. The Forest is the ancestral home to the Me-Wuk who moved with the seasons and through the landscape of the Sierra for thousands of years.

Q?

Where is the Stanislaus National Forest?

A.

The Stanislaus National Forest encompasses 898,099 acres on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada; California’s snowcapped mountain range that flanks the Great Central Valley. The Forest is located between Lake Tahoe and Yosemite. It is approximately a two hour drive from the Great Central Valley and three hours from the San Francisco Bay Area.